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Her Secret Service Code Name and Other Lesser Known Facts about First Lady Rosalynn Carter

Rosalynn Carter is best known for her advocacy for mental health issues, caregiver issues, as co-founder of The Carter Center and founder of the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism. But there’s more to this “steel magnolia.” Here are 25 facts about Rosalynn Carter.

Journalism Fellow Invites Viewers Along on Family’s Alzheimer’s Journey

Christie Ethridge Diez is a reporter and anchor for Atlanta TV station @11alive (WXIA) and a 2020-2021 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow. In late March 2021, she shared her story of loss, grief, and strength on the Carter Center’s Instagram account after her father’s Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. Her moving posts, minimally edited, are reproduced here. All photos are courtesy …

Pandemic Proves Global Mental Health Can’t Be Ignored

Dr. Kashef Ijaz is vice president for health programs at The Carter Center.

Global mental health has been called the “silent,” “parallel,” or “next” pandemic.

In fact, mental health was deteriorating even before the COVID-19 crisis unfolded. In 2018, The Carter Center contributed to a Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health, which says that “the global burden of disease attributable …

Improving Access to Mental Health Care in Georgia: How Georgians Can Get Involved

Many Georgians face barriers to accessing mental health care. While this is not a new problem, The Carter Center believes it is urgent that state leaders address the issue during the current public health crisis.

Expert Q&A | What’s at Stake for Mental Health Policy in Georgia?

Under the leadership of Rosalynn Carter, the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program is joining with partner organizations to bring attention to urgent public policy issues impacting mental health in Georgia and across the United States.

The Carter Center’s Helen Robinson, associate director of public policy in the Mental Health Program, answers questions about how the program works to improve access …

Carter Fellow Reflects on Challenging and Enriching Year

Courtenay Harris Bond is a 2017–18 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship recipient. She is a freelance journalist and currently a Scattergood Foundation Journalist-in-Residence.

Q: What was your project as a Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow?

I examined the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder in the real world. I spent the year following individuals through …

Mental Health Gains Global Focus

Under the leadership and guidance of former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, The Carter Center Mental Health Program is joining with other organizations to bring attention and resources to mental health care, both in the United States and abroad. Program Director Eve Byrd explains.

After Decades of War, National and Personal Healing Begins

My country suffered through 50 years of violent internal conflict before The Carter Center and others helped the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia conclude a historic peace agreement in 2016. While the parties to the talks continue to create and shape a new political reality, people who lived through the conflict are seeking ways to deal with what they have seen and endured.

UAE Journalist Reflects on Eye-Opening Year

Iman Ben Chaibah is the recipient of a 2017–2018 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship. She also is CEO and editor in chief of Sail, an online magazine produced in the United Arab Emirates.

In September, I completed my Rosalynn Carter Fellowship in Mental Health Journalism. The fellowships were started by former First Lady Rosalynn Carter about 20 years ago …

Carter Fellows Get Social, Build Engaged Communities

To extend the reach of their stories and maintain relevance in a world of spinning news cycles, journalists today often have mandates to create social media accounts and share a weekly quota of posts on them.

But for Jaclyn Cosgrove, a 2015-16 recipient of the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism, social media means more than just posting her …

Carter Center Conveys Note of Pride in South Africa Program

Rebecca Palpant Shimkets, associate director in the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program, develops and oversees the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism.

Seeing South Africa’s mental health journalism program blossom fills me, along with Rosalynn Carter and everyone here at the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program, with the kind of pride one feels when a family member receives a …

Clinicians Attend to Young Minds in Liberia

Liberia’s 2014-2015 Ebola crisis, following a 14-year civil war, left devastated families in its wake. Thousands of children and adolescents were orphaned, confined in isolation units, or stranded at home watching loved ones suffer and die, triggering a special set of post-traumatic mental health challenges.

In response, The Carter Center in 2016 launched a second phase of its successful mental …

Words Matter: Talking About Mental Health | Webcast Archive

One simple way we can help people dealing with mental illness is by choosing our words with care. How we speak and write about mental illness can help either reinforce or break down stereotypes. The Carter Center has long worked to reduce stigma by providing fellowships to journalists covering mental health.

Learn more about the fellows’ work and discover ways …

‘MIND/GAME’ Documentary Details Star Athlete’s Struggle with Mental Illness

Success in sports is said to be 90 percent mental. Even for a physically gifted athlete like Chamique Holdsclaw, that number may be low.

The struggle with mental illness for Holdsclaw, a former basketball superstar at every level, is the subject of the film “MIND/GAME: The Unquiet Journey of Chamique Holdsclaw.” Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Rick Goldsmith produced and directed the …

‘Buried Above Ground’ Sparks Dialogue, Empowers Audiences

Ben Selkow is a documentary filmmaker and a 2010-11 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow.

In summarizing his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience, war veteran and former U.S. Army Captain Luis Carlos Montalván says, “A disproportionate amount of time is spent thinking about the past than your average person. That goes along very much with, what if the worst thing …