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Now Is Not the Time to Quit Fighting Neglected Tropical Diseases

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer, and Kashef Ijaz, vice president, Health Programs The Carter Center

The world’s most vulnerable people work hard every day to overcome poverty and disease. They aren’t interested in handouts, but with a hand up they can get the resources they need to surmount obstacles to prosperity and peace.

That’s why The Carter Center is …

Health Programs’ Benefits Remain Long After We’re Gone

 

 

Dr. Kashef Ijaz is vice president for health programs at The Carter Center.

 

 

The Carter Center’s neglected tropical disease programs treat and prevent Guinea worm disease, trachoma, river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, and schistosomiasis, with the goal to control, eliminate, and eradicate. Beyond the alleviation of the human suffering caused by these illnesses, this work brings ancillary …

The Work Is Worth It, and It Isn’t Finished

The observance of World Neglected Tropical Disease Day on Jan. 30 (following the public launch of the 2030 NTD Road Map by the WHO on Jan. 28) prompts me to reflect on my good fortune in overseeing the Carter Center’s tireless work to free people from an array of illnesses that cause untold misery and perpetuate the cycle of poverty.

Carter Center Initiative Striking Out Disease on Hispaniola

For these boys, freedom from a disfiguring disease means freedom to pursue their dreams on the diamond.

Angel Ciriaco and Rigoberto Bryan are best friends who live in San Pedro de Macoris, a province in the southeastern Dominican Republic. The two 16-year-olds like to talk about school, about girls, and most of all about baseball.

Baseball is a big deal …

100&Change | Health Education Matters

Dr. Frank Richards, who directs the Carter Center’s programs on river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, and schistosomiasis, explains why health education matters in the fight to eliminate diseases.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a …

From the CEO | Center Hits 500 Million Milestone

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

Big institutional milestones are the result of small individual efforts.

As I write this, The Carter Center is closing in on the distribution of its 500 millionth dose of drugs to combat neglected tropical diseases. That’s half a billion doses of medication given to tens of …

Hunting Parasites in the Dark

Parasites keep strange schedules. Those that cause lymphatic filariasis, for example, are mostly active at night. To detect parasites in the blood, health workers will take a nocturnal sample, sometimes as late as 2 a.m.

This explains why a colleague and I were knocking at nearly midnight on the battered door of Esther’s cinderblock home in a small batey in …

Malaria Fight in Hispaniola Requires Tailored Approach

In honor of Malaria Day in the Americas, we asked Carter Center expert and epidemiologist Dr. Gregory Noland to explain how fighting the disease in Hispaniola differs from strategies employed in Africa.

The island of Hispaniola, shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is the only island in the Caribbean that has not yet eliminated malaria. The Carter Center’s Hispaniola …

Scaling up: Center-supported Treatments Reach Record Numbers

In 2014, Carter Center health programs assisted in the distribution of more drug treatments for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) than in any previous year, demonstrating the Center’s commitment to alleviating suffering and improving the lives of those who live in the world’s poorest and most isolated communities.

Drug-based treatments, in combination with health education and simple, low-cost methods, are at …

Breaking the Cycle of Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis | Q&A with Dr. Stephen Blount

The Carter Center began its work in Haiti and the Dominican Republic after a 2006 recommendation by the Center-sponsored International Task Force for Disease Eradication declared it is “technically feasible, medically desirable, and economically beneficial” to eliminate both malaria and lymphatic filariasis from the shared island of Hispaniola. 

Today, Dr. Stephen Blount, director of Special Health Programs at The Carter …

Carter Center, Merck, and Partners Celebrate 25th Anniversary of Mectizan Donation Program

At a special ceremony at The Carter Center in Atlanta today, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former Merck CEO Dr. Roy Vagelos, former Carter Center Executive Director, Dr. Bill Foege, and other guests and dignitaries from around the world gathered to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Merck’s Mectizan® Donation Program.

“Twenty-five years after Merck’s unprecedented ongoing donation of Mectizan, significant …

Notes from the Field: Listening to Communities We Serve to Better Combat Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis, Improve Bed Net Education

At the invitation of the Nigerian government, The Carter Center began health program work in Nigeria in 1988. In 2010, the largest long-lasting insecticidal net distribution effort in history to fight malaria was launched in Nigeria, which bears more deaths from this disease than any other country. The goal is to provide every household in the country with two nets. …

Carter Center Health Programs and Partners Celebrate Record Progress, 35.8 Million Treatments in Fight Against Neglected Tropical Diseases in 2010

The Carter Center’s health programs enabled a record 35.8 million treatments in 2010 to protect against neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in thousands of communities in some of the most remote and forgotten places in Africa and the Americas.

Since 1986, The Carter Center has been a leader in the control, elimination, and eradication of neglected diseases, working at the grassroots …

Carter Center Hosts Annual Health Program Reviews

The Carter Center is hosting its 2009 health program reviews March 23-31, 2010, with experts from around the world –including representatives from partner organizations including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Lions Clubs International, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – gathered in Atlanta to assess program status and adopt recommendations for the …