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Nigeria Public Health Training Initiative Turns Reins Over to Sokoto State

Expert Q&A with Alhaji Abubakar Tambuwal, provost of the College of Nursing Science in Sokoto state, Nigeria

The Nigeria Public Health Training Initiative recently transitioned from a Carter Center-assisted project to state-level ownership in each of the six implementing states, including Akwa Ibom, Gombe, Imo, Ogun, Plateau, and Sokoto. Alhaji Abubakar Tambuwal, provost of the College of Nursing Science, Sokoto …

Journalism Fellow Invites Viewers Along on Family’s Alzheimer’s Journey

Christie Ethridge Diez is a reporter and anchor for Atlanta TV station @11alive (WXIA) and a 2020-2021 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow. In late March 2021, she shared her story of loss, grief, and strength on the Carter Center’s Instagram account after her father’s Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. Her moving posts, minimally edited, are reproduced here. All photos are courtesy …

Partner Countries Take Ownership of Their Success

Dr. Kashef Ijaz is vice president for health programs at The Carter Center.

Following on my commentary last month regarding health care capacity building at the community level, it’s fitting now to acknowledge our government partners’ eagerness and ability to exercise ownership of programs taking place within their borders.

A prime example is the Carter Center’s Public Health Training Initiative. …

Trachoma Staffers Make Exam Scopes at Home

Vanessa Scholtens is a program associate in the Carter Center Trachoma Control Program.

How do we know if a person has trachoma, a bacterial eye disease? A trained worker must examine a person’s inner eyelid and look for the signs.

But when a geographical area becomes successful at eliminating the disease—which is, of course, the Carter Center’s goal—it becomes hard …

Now Is Not the Time to Quit Fighting Neglected Tropical Diseases

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer, and Kashef Ijaz, vice president, Health Programs The Carter Center

The world’s most vulnerable people work hard every day to overcome poverty and disease. They aren’t interested in handouts, but with a hand up they can get the resources they need to surmount obstacles to prosperity and peace.

That’s why The Carter Center is …

From the CEO | Coronavirus Can’t Compete With the Carter Center’s Commitment

When new CEO Paige Alexander first saw the cafeteria in the Carter Center’s Atlanta office, paper shamrocks and pots of gold adorned the walls to mark St. Patrick’s Day. Only it wasn’t March. It was June 2020.

Pandemic Proves Global Mental Health Can’t Be Ignored

Dr. Kashef Ijaz is vice president for health programs at The Carter Center.

Global mental health has been called the “silent,” “parallel,” or “next” pandemic.

In fact, mental health was deteriorating even before the COVID-19 crisis unfolded. In 2018, The Carter Center contributed to a Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health, which says that “the global burden of disease attributable …

Improving Access to Mental Health Care in Georgia: How Georgians Can Get Involved

Many Georgians face barriers to accessing mental health care. While this is not a new problem, The Carter Center believes it is urgent that state leaders address the issue during the current public health crisis.

The Work Is Worth It, and It Isn’t Finished

The observance of World Neglected Tropical Disease Day on Jan. 30 (following the public launch of the 2030 NTD Road Map by the WHO on Jan. 28) prompts me to reflect on my good fortune in overseeing the Carter Center’s tireless work to free people from an array of illnesses that cause untold misery and perpetuate the cycle of poverty.

From the CEO | Center Makes Most of New Normal

I don’t need to tell you what a strange and challenging year 2020 has been.

A pandemic has forced us to avoid close human interactions, but The Carter Center has been fortunate and is taking advantage of the opportunities that technology brings to keep moving forward with our mission to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope.

Altering Behavior Can Mean a Change for the Better

Kelly Callahan, M.P.H., is director of the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program.

When COVID-19 appeared, the first thing public health experts advised us all to do was to wash our hands frequently and thoroughly. This is excellent advice, and it’s what the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program has been teaching people for 20 years.

As humans, changing our behavior is …

Expert Q&A | What’s at Stake for Mental Health Policy in Georgia?

Under the leadership of Rosalynn Carter, the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program is joining with partner organizations to bring attention to urgent public policy issues impacting mental health in Georgia and across the United States.

The Carter Center’s Helen Robinson, associate director of public policy in the Mental Health Program, answers questions about how the program works to improve access …

From the CEO | Staying Positive, Building Hope

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the CEO of The Carter Center.

At this time of great challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been deeply moved by the commitment of our Carter Center staff to our mission to help the world’s poorest people. Indeed, our aim to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope has never been more …

Uganda Community Goes from Misery to Joy

Peace Habomugisha began working for The Carter Center as a social scientist in 1999. She became the Center’s Uganda country director in 2003, supporting the federal Ministry of Health’s River Blindness Elimination Program, one of the first to make complete elimination a national goal. The program succeeds with the support of its partners, including The Carter Center, USAID’s Act to …

Guinea Worm Killed My Uncles

Daniel Deng Madit Kuchlong, aka Daniel Deng, is a health agent with South Sudan’s Guinea Worm Eradication Program. Here is his firsthand account, lightly edited, of how Guinea worm has affected his life.

When I was a young boy, I had two uncles. Both were heavily infected with Guinea worms, and back then, no one here knew how Guinea worm …