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Improving Access to Mental Health Care in Georgia: How Georgians Can Get Involved

Many Georgians face barriers to accessing mental health care. While this is not a new problem, The Carter Center believes it is urgent that state leaders address the issue during the current public health crisis.

The Work Is Worth It, and It Isn’t Finished

The observance of World Neglected Tropical Disease Day on Jan. 30 (following the public launch of the 2030 NTD Road Map by the WHO on Jan. 28) prompts me to reflect on my good fortune in overseeing the Carter Center’s tireless work to free people from an array of illnesses that cause untold misery and perpetuate the cycle of poverty.

From the CEO | Center Makes Most of New Normal

I don’t need to tell you what a strange and challenging year 2020 has been.

A pandemic has forced us to avoid close human interactions, but The Carter Center has been fortunate and is taking advantage of the opportunities that technology brings to keep moving forward with our mission to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope.

Altering Behavior Can Mean a Change for the Better

Kelly Callahan, M.P.H., is director of the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program.

When COVID-19 appeared, the first thing public health experts advised us all to do was to wash our hands frequently and thoroughly. This is excellent advice, and it’s what the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program has been teaching people for 20 years.

As humans, changing our behavior is …

Expert Q&A | What’s at Stake for Mental Health Policy in Georgia?

Under the leadership of Rosalynn Carter, the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program is joining with partner organizations to bring attention to urgent public policy issues impacting mental health in Georgia and across the United States.

The Carter Center’s Helen Robinson, associate director of public policy in the Mental Health Program, answers questions about how the program works to improve access …

From the CEO | Staying Positive, Building Hope

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the CEO of The Carter Center.

At this time of great challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been deeply moved by the commitment of our Carter Center staff to our mission to help the world’s poorest people. Indeed, our aim to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope has never been more …

Uganda Community Goes from Misery to Joy

Peace Habomugisha began working for The Carter Center as a social scientist in 1999. She became the Center’s Uganda country director in 2003, supporting the federal Ministry of Health’s River Blindness Elimination Program, one of the first to make complete elimination a national goal. The program succeeds with the support of its partners, including The Carter Center, USAID’s Act to …

Guinea Worm Killed My Uncles

Daniel Deng Madit Kuchlong, aka Daniel Deng, is a health agent with South Sudan’s Guinea Worm Eradication Program. Here is his firsthand account, lightly edited, of how Guinea worm has affected his life.

When I was a young boy, I had two uncles. Both were heavily infected with Guinea worms, and back then, no one here knew how Guinea worm …

Making Guinea Worm Disease Gone for Good

Abeer Al Fouti is Executive Director of Global Initiatives, Alwaleed Philanthropies.

You almost certainly have never heard of Guinea worm disease. It doesn’t generate news headlines, is not often top of mind for global health experts, and does not attract large-scale funding for eradication efforts. Yet we are close to eliminating this devastating disease, with just a final effort required …

From the CEO | Innovation Embedded in Center’s Activities

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the CEO of The Carter Center.

In 1982, President and Mrs. Carter created a new kind of post-presidential institution, not a think tank, but an organization acting to alleviate suffering and advance human rights for the world’s poorest people. Ever since, innovation has been part of the Center’s DNA.

From the beginning, the Center …

Where the Need for Services Goes, We Follow

Angelia Sanders is associate director of the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program and vice chair of the International Coalition for Trachoma Control.

Natural disasters, conflict, and other factors can force entire populations to leave their homes and seek safer living conditions elsewhere. Such people are known as internally displaced persons (or IDPs) if they move within their home country or …

From the CEO | Communication Cultivates Grassroots Impact

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

The Carter Center operates dozens of initiatives addressing a range of challenging peace and health issues. Some of them seek to end human rights abuses and promote sustainable peace, while others help improve the health of at-risk people in remote places.

What all these projects have …

Carter Fellow Reflects on Challenging and Enriching Year

Courtenay Harris Bond is a 2017–18 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship recipient. She is a freelance journalist and currently a Scattergood Foundation Journalist-in-Residence.

Q: What was your project as a Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow?

I examined the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder in the real world. I spent the year following individuals through …

Q&A: Seeking Better Outcomes for Mothers and Babies

Through its Public Health Training Initiatives in Nigeria and Sudan, The Carter Center helps educational institutions improve the way they prepare health workers to serve the public. In Nigeria, the initiative supports one institution in each of six states.

Director Kenneth Korve, who leads the initiative from the Carter Center’s office in Jos, Plateau state, explains through a series of …

Malaria Exacts a Tragic Toll

In the poor neighborhoods where malaria festers in the Dominican Republic, people describe someone who hustles through everyday life as a chiripero, a “lucky sort.”