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From the CEO: Small Actions Yield Big Successes

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

We think big at The Carter Center. Big ideas, big plans, big goals.

Guinea worm disease was a big problem—3.5 million cases a year—when we started working on it, but today we’re within reach of eradicating it. Observing 103 elections in 39 countries has been a …

100&Change | Community Volunteers Key to River Blindness Strategy

Dr. Emmanuel Miri is the country representative in Nigeria for The Carter Center.

Gabriel Ani is a farmer and schoolteacher in the Ndiulo Enugu-Nato village in Enugu State, Nigeria, who loves his community and is loved back. Gabriel is a community volunteer drug distributor — the hands, feet, and heart of our River Blindness Elimination Program. For nine years, he …

100&Change | Community Volunteer Joel Kasuwa Gives Back

Watch how Nigerian Joel Kasuwa, a passionate and committed volunteer, is working with The Carter Center to help us eliminate river blindness in Nigeria.

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a critical problem of our …

Pathways to Peace: Patience and Persistence Pay Off

Jordan Ryan is vice president, peace programs, at The Carter Center.

The Carter Center’s motto is “Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope.” In today’s world, the task for peacemakers is urgent.

In a series of posts on this blog, I share some of the approaches to waging peace that that The Carter Center and its founder, former President Jimmy Carter, …

Center Initiative Studies How Daesh Exploits Children

The Carter Center’s Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Extremism initiative has issued a paper that analyzes how the Islamic extremist group targets children in its recruitment materials and uses them in its operations.

“Children are a vital propaganda tool in Daesh’s recruitment phenomenon,” the paper states. They appear in videos to illustrate a range of Daesh narratives.

But children aren’t …

100&Change | From the CEO: A Vision for All of Africa

Leveraging the experience of our pioneering work to eradicate Guinea worm disease, The Carter Center made the audacious decision to pursue elimination of river blindness (onchocerciasis) everywhere we work on it in Africa and Latin America.

Waging Peace in Turbulent Times | Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Waging Peace in Turbulent Times” on April 13, 2017, an archived webcast of this event can be viewed below.

Hear from two of The Carter Center’s Peace Program directors, Hrair Balian of the Conflict Resolution Program and Jennie Lincoln of the Latin American and Caribbean Program, as they discuss the efforts the Center is undertaking to …

Watch President Jimmy Carter’s Remarks this Week to the 2017 WHO’s Global Partners Meeting in Geneva on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)

Watch the video below to hear former U.S. President Jimmy Carter’s remarks at the 2017 World Health Organization’s Global Partners Meeting in Geneva on the worldwide effort to reduce the burden of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).

“Our collaborative effort to reduce the burden of Neglected Tropical Diseases sends a message of hope to all people, but most especially to those …

100&Change | Nigeria’s Minister of Health and the Carter Center’s CEO Discuss River Blindness Elimination

Why is it critical to eliminate river blindness in Nigeria? Our CEO Amb. Mary Ann Peters and Nigerian Minister of Health Dr. Isaac Adewole explain the need and great potential in this brief video.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises …

Pathways to Peace: The Second Principle

Jordan Ryan is vice president, peace programs, at The Carter Center.

In today’s world, the task for peacemakers is urgent.

The Carter Center’s motto is “Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope.” A promise to wage peace acknowledges that true peace is more than just the absence of conflict. Peacebuilders know that conflicts will recur if underlying causes are not addressed.…

Pathways to Peace: The First Principle

Jordan Ryan is vice president, peace programs, at The Carter Center.

In this time of extreme polarization, when violence seems to be the “new normal,” we face a threat of escalating conflict at home and abroad. The task for peacemakers is urgent.

There are so many issues that impact global safety and security. Some we are only beginning to understand: …

Ethiopia Trachoma Control Program Far Exceeds 2016 Surgical Goal

One of the horrible hallmarks of advanced trachoma is a painful inward turning of the eyelids. This condition, called trachomatous trichiasis, causes the sufferer’s eyelashes to scrape the surface of the eye, often leading to blindness. Among other interventions, The Carter Center trains and equips local health-care workers to perform a simple outpatient surgical procedure that reverses the condition.

Clinicians Attend to Young Minds in Liberia

Liberia’s 2014-2015 Ebola crisis, following a 14-year civil war, left devastated families in its wake. Thousands of children and adolescents were orphaned, confined in isolation units, or stranded at home watching loved ones suffer and die, triggering a special set of post-traumatic mental health challenges.

In response, The Carter Center in 2016 launched a second phase of its successful mental …

100&Change | MacArthur’s Cecilia Conrad Discusses the Carter Center’s Proposal

Cecilia Conrad, managing director of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, discusses the Carter Center’s 100&Change proposal, which aims to eliminate river blindness in Nigeria.

100&Change is a unique competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that addresses a critical problem of our time in any field or any location.

Related Resources

Learn more …

We Accomplish Much by Working Together

After leaving the White House, Rosalynn and I searched our hearts for ways to use our unique position to help those less fortunate around the world. We knew that two issues were of paramount importance: advancing peace and preventing human suffering.

So, in 1982 we took a leap of faith and founded The Carter Center. Waging peace, fighting disease, and …