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A Carter Center Podcast | How Proven Strategies and Passion Prevent Blindness from Trachoma

Kelly Callahan is passionate about preventing blindness in some of the world’s most vulnerable populations. Callahan, who leads the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program, explains how the Center works with the governments and partners in Africa to use the proven SAFE strategies to stop trachoma, the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness.

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More on the Trachoma Control Program…

Groundbreaking Study Could Revolutionize Public Health

A landmark study in which The Carter Center is participating could radically change the public health model in the developing world, experts say.

The multi-year, three-country study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in April 2018, confirms a 2009 study led by The Carter Center that found that mass administration of the antibiotic azithromycin for the infectious eye …

Partnership Has Had Trachoma on the Run for 20 Years

Hard work for a good cause can be its own reward. It’s even better when you have results to show for it. In 2018 The Carter Center is marking 20 years of impact against trachoma, the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness.

Ethiopia Trachoma Control Program Far Exceeds 2016 Surgical Goal

One of the horrible hallmarks of advanced trachoma is a painful inward turning of the eyelids. This condition, called trachomatous trichiasis, causes the sufferer’s eyelashes to scrape the surface of the eye, often leading to blindness. Among other interventions, The Carter Center trains and equips local health-care workers to perform a simple outpatient surgical procedure that reverses the condition.

New VP Gets Close-up Look at Work in the Field

I’m the new guy around here.

Although I’ve visited and worked in many places during my medical career – including multiple overseas deployments with the U.S. Army – my first trip abroad with The Carter Center was a new highlight.

I had the privilege of joining a delegation that visited Nigeria in the fall of 2016, five months after I …

Nigeria Teen Receives Ceremonial Dose of Praziquantel

Thirteen-year-old Jude Musa looked serious, even stoic, as a volunteer from his village gauged his height with a measuring stick. Community drug distributor Yusuf Maikeffi determined the proper dose of praziquantel and handed the tablets to the boy, who popped them into his mouth and chased them with fresh water from a plastic pouch.

With that small exchange in Gidan …

Scaling up: Center-supported Treatments Reach Record Numbers

In 2014, Carter Center health programs assisted in the distribution of more drug treatments for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) than in any previous year, demonstrating the Center’s commitment to alleviating suffering and improving the lives of those who live in the world’s poorest and most isolated communities.

Drug-based treatments, in combination with health education and simple, low-cost methods, are at …

Notes From the Field: In Ethiopia, We Handle Trachoma Directly

I learned how great a need there was for eye services in my community during the 10 years I spent working for the Ethiopian government as an ophthalmic expert. Ethiopia has one of the highest rates of blindness in the world, and trachoma is a major cause of this disability in my country.

It is hard to ignore the groups …

The Sight Behind the Statistic

It may be tempting to hear about a neglected disease like trachoma and the 390 million people globally at risk and think of trachoma only as another sad statistic in a world where there is too much suffering and where there are not enough solutions.

Woman Sees Better Future After Eye Surgery

Stephanie Palmer is assistant director for the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program.

Flies buzzed in our faces as Fatahou Ibrahim, a Nigerien public health student, and I interviewed Assana*, a young woman with the eye disease trichiasis, and her mother, Habiba, sitting on colorful plastic mats beneath a tree. Assana, in her early 20s, said that trichiasis felt as though …

Celebrating the 100 Millionth Treatment for Blinding Trachoma

In early November, The Carter Center reached a trachoma milestone: supporting the distribution of more than 100 million doses of the trachoma-fighting drug Zithromax®, donated by Pfizer Inc. These treatments were provided over the last 11 years to trachoma-endemic communities in six African countries: Ethiopia, Mali, Nigeria, Niger, Sudan, and South Sudan.

The 100 millionth dose was distributed in Ethiopia’s …

President Carter Discusses Neglected Diseases on ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’

President Carter spoke with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on “Good Morning America” on Nov. 5, about The Carter Center’s fight to wipe out trachoma and combat other neglected diseases.

“No former president has served longer out of office or made such a mark against some of the world’s most intractable problems,” Stephanopoulos said as he introduced the president.…

Dr. Paul Emerson and Huffington Post Live Launch Carter Center’s Call for Action Against Trachoma

This is an excerpt from Carter Center Trachoma Control Program Director Dr. Paul Emerson’s Huffington Post Blog, “The Eye of the Beholder: Why Fighting Trachoma Matters.”

School Girl Helps Family Fight Trachoma

Stewart was a summer 2012 graduate assistant for the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program. She traveled to Ethiopia to help survey families about the Center’s trachoma prevention activities in partnership with the local communities.

Azmera Yogzaw(Photo: A. Stewart/Carter Center)

We met 13-year-old Azmera Yogzaw in the community of Chals, Ethiopia during a trachoma program impact assessment. Chals is a small …

Worn as Pendants, Makeshift Tweezers Reflect Desperation for Relief from Blinding Trachoma

Use becomes more rare as Center, partners make major strides against the disease.

The wishbone-like tweezers, folded from pieces of tin cans, look like a charm or pendant, but have a gruesome purpose. In a desperate measure to find relief from the agony of advanced-stage trachoma — during which a person’s eyelashes turn inward, scraping the cornea with every excruciating …