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Hunting Parasites in the Dark

Parasites keep strange schedules. Those that cause lymphatic filariasis, for example, are mostly active at night. To detect parasites in the blood, health workers will take a nocturnal sample, sometimes as late as 2 a.m.

This explains why a colleague and I were knocking at nearly midnight on the battered door of Esther’s cinderblock home in a small batey in …

Notes From the Field | Guatemala Eliminates River Blindness

Dr. Frank Richards leads the Carter Center’s efforts to eliminate river blindness (also known as onchocerciasis), a parasitic disease transmitted by the bites of infected black flies.

My career has come full circle. I was working in Guatemala for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1988 on the parasitic worm disease called river blindness. Then, Guatemala was …

A Conversation with the Carters | Webcast Archive

In case you missed “A Conversation with the Carters” on Sept. 13, 2016, an archived webcast of this event can be viewed below.

Hear former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter discuss recent Carter Center peace and health initiatives around the world and take questions from the audience about issues big and small.

 

About Conversations …

Carter Center Unveils New Website

Welcome to the Carter Center’s new website which embraces new tools, new technology, and new servers. The result? A new and improved website with an updated look.

Designed for ease of use, the site launched today is simple to navigate, with pages that are wide and easy to read. You’ll find dynamic content, large images, smooth access to our social …

Local People Know Best | From the CEO

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

The Carter Center operates under the firm conviction that people are capable of solving their own challenges, and our role is to provide them the tools and training to do it.

“The poorest of all people, who are often scorned or derogated, are just as intelligent …

Words Matter: Talking About Mental Health | Webcast Archive

One simple way we can help people dealing with mental illness is by choosing our words with care. How we speak and write about mental illness can help either reinforce or break down stereotypes. The Carter Center has long worked to reduce stigma by providing fellowships to journalists covering mental health.

Learn more about the fellows’ work and discover ways …

Changing the World Through Partnership | From the CEO

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

During my 18 months at The Carter Center, I’ve been struck repeatedly not only by the frequency of our successes, but also by the chance to appreciate them on two vastly differ­ent scales.

To know we’ve observed 101 elections is one thing. To speak with an …

Center Poised for Future Impact | From the CEO

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

Carter Center founders Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter have been an inspiration for our work for more than three decades. With President Carter’s recent announcement that he is in treatment for melanoma, many of our friends have asked what the plans are for Carter Center programs without …

‘MIND/GAME’ Documentary Details Star Athlete’s Struggle with Mental Illness

Success in sports is said to be 90 percent mental. Even for a physically gifted athlete like Chamique Holdsclaw, that number may be low.

The struggle with mental illness for Holdsclaw, a former basketball superstar at every level, is the subject of the film “MIND/GAME: The Unquiet Journey of Chamique Holdsclaw.” Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Rick Goldsmith produced and directed the …

Malaria Fight in Hispaniola Requires Tailored Approach

In honor of Malaria Day in the Americas, we asked Carter Center expert and epidemiologist Dr. Gregory Noland to explain how fighting the disease in Hispaniola differs from strategies employed in Africa.

The island of Hispaniola, shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is the only island in the Caribbean that has not yet eliminated malaria. The Carter Center’s Hispaniola …

‘Buried Above Ground’ Sparks Dialogue, Empowers Audiences

Ben Selkow is a documentary filmmaker and a 2010-11 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow.

In summarizing his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience, war veteran and former U.S. Army Captain Luis Carlos Montalván says, “A disproportionate amount of time is spent thinking about the past than your average person. That goes along very much with, what if the worst thing …

Mental Health in Liberia: Stand Up and Act!

Matthew Nyanplu is a journalist in Monrovia, Liberia, and has worked with local and international nongovernmental organizations on human rights and community-based rehabilitation. In July 2015, he co-facilitated the “Mental Health Disabilities and Human Rights” module for the Carter Center’s Post-Basic Mental Health Training Program in Liberia.

In the last few years, there has been an awakening in the consciousness …

A Conversation with the Carters 2015 | Webcast Archive

In case you missed “A Conversation with the Carters” on Sept. 15 at The Carter Center, an archived version of the webcast can be viewed below.

About Conversations at The Carter Center

Conversations brings you up close with Carter Center experts, policy makers, and other special guests to discuss the issues that shape your world. All Conversations are webcast live …

Five Important Facts About Guinea Worm

Donald Hopkins, M.D., is special advisor to the Guinea Worm Eradication Program at The Carter Center and has been leading the effort to eradicate this neglected disease for over 25 years. Listen below as he tells NPR’s Robin Young about the Center’s efforts to rid the world of this ancient and painful affliction.

Five Facts About Guinea Worm from Dr.

Integrated Care Key to Better Outcomes

Dr. John Bartlett is senior project adviser in the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program.

In 1993, my 92-year-old mother suffered a severe heart attack. After two months in the hospital, she returned home a changed woman. On the day of her heart attack, she had been dancing around in her famous red pantsuit with her grandchildren, but back at home …