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Center Staffer Lays His Life on the Line

Scientific or logistical challenges aren’t the only issues Carter Center personnel have to deal with while tracking down, treating, and preventing neglected tropical diseases in remote places. Cultural issues often play a role as well, and we have to handle them respectfully and sensitively.

For example, in many places, ponds and rivers are considered to be sacred dwelling places of …

Carter Center Provides Pounds of Prevention

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

We all know Benjamin Franklin’s proverb “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” It makes sense to try to keep a bad thing from happening rather than to try to fix the mess that results if you let the bad thing happen. This …

A Unique Collaboration

The Carter Center and Emory University celebrate an amazing 35-year partnership in 2017, a rare and productive union between a nongovernmental organization and a leading institution of higher education. Together, our reach has improved the lives of millions of the world’s poorest people through disease prevention, conflict resolution, and the strengthening of human rights and democracy.

A Carter Center Podcast | Andrea Petersen’s Journey through Anxiety

If you know someone who lives with anxiety, you won’t want to miss this podcast with Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow Andrea Petersen. Petersen describes how she transformed “from a slightly silly sorority girl to a terrorized shut-in in just a few weeks’ time.”

Her medical odyssey and numerous ER visits finally led to an anxiety disorder diagnosis and …

Community’s Trust and Commitment Ensure Success

Dr. Dean G. Sienko, Vice President, Health Programs, The Carter Center

At The Carter Center, we never want anyone to be dependent on us. All of our programs are designed to solve problems, and to help our partners build their own capability, resiliency, and self-reliance. We believe in meaningful partnerships, not only with donors and governments but also—and most importantly—with …

100&Change | Catching Flies in Nigeria

Juliana Onwumere is a neglected tropical disease coordinator in Imo state ministry of health. As The Carter Center and partners fight to eliminate river blindness disease in Nigeria, one of Onwumere’s tasks is to collect black flies to be tested for evidence of the disease.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for …

100&Change | Nigeria’s Dr. Adewole Aims to Put River Blindness in ’Dust Bin of History’

Millions will be spared future suffering thanks to collaborative efforts of The Carter Center and Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Health to address widespread neglected diseases such river blindness. Hear from Nigeria’s Minister of Health, Dr. Isaac Adewole, on the importance of this partnership.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 …

100&Change | The Carter Center Takes Aim at a Big Fish

Dr. Frank Richards leads the Carter Center’s efforts to eliminate river blindness (also known as onchocerciasis), a parasitic disease transmitted by the bites of infected black flies.

There’s a famous line in the movie “Jaws” – after the stunned sheriff sees the monster shark for the first time, he says to the shark hunter: “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”…

Carter Center Conveys Note of Pride in South Africa Program

Rebecca Palpant Shimkets, associate director in the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program, develops and oversees the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism.

Seeing South Africa’s mental health journalism program blossom fills me, along with Rosalynn Carter and everyone here at the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program, with the kind of pride one feels when a family member receives a …

100&Change | Health Education Matters

Dr. Frank Richards, who directs the Carter Center’s programs on river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, and schistosomiasis, explains why health education matters in the fight to eliminate diseases.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a …

From the CEO: Small Actions Yield Big Successes

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

We think big at The Carter Center. Big ideas, big plans, big goals.

Guinea worm disease was a big problem—3.5 million cases a year—when we started working on it, but today we’re within reach of eradicating it. Observing 103 elections in 39 countries has been a …

100&Change | Community Volunteers Key to River Blindness Strategy

Dr. Emmanuel Miri is the country representative in Nigeria for The Carter Center.

Gabriel Ani is a farmer and schoolteacher in the Ndiulo Enugu-Nato village in Enugu State, Nigeria, who loves his community and is loved back. Gabriel is a community volunteer drug distributor — the hands, feet, and heart of our River Blindness Elimination Program. For nine years, he …

100&Change | Community Volunteer Joel Kasuwa Gives Back

Watch how Nigerian Joel Kasuwa, a passionate and committed volunteer, is working with The Carter Center to help us eliminate river blindness in Nigeria.

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a critical problem of our …

100&Change | From the CEO: A Vision for All of Africa

Leveraging the experience of our pioneering work to eradicate Guinea worm disease, The Carter Center made the audacious decision to pursue elimination of river blindness (onchocerciasis) everywhere we work on it in Africa and Latin America.

Watch President Jimmy Carter’s Remarks this Week to the 2017 WHO’s Global Partners Meeting in Geneva on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)

Watch the video below to hear former U.S. President Jimmy Carter’s remarks at the 2017 World Health Organization’s Global Partners Meeting in Geneva on the worldwide effort to reduce the burden of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).

“Our collaborative effort to reduce the burden of Neglected Tropical Diseases sends a message of hope to all people, but most especially to those …