The Carter Center Blog

Join President Carter’s Call to Action

The suffering of women and girls can be alleviated when individuals take forceful actions, which can impact larger society, asserts President Carter in his new book “A Call to Action.” Political and religious leaders share a special responsibility, but the fact is that all of us can act within our own spheres of influence to meet these challenges.

In “A …

Woman Sees Better Future After Eye Surgery

Stephanie Palmer is assistant director for the Carter Center’s Trachoma Control Program.

Flies buzzed in our faces as Fatahou Ibrahim, a Nigerien public health student, and I interviewed Assana*, a young woman with the eye disease trichiasis, and her mother, Habiba, sitting on colorful plastic mats beneath a tree. Assana, in her early 20s, said that trichiasis felt as though …

Working to Improve the Mental Health Care System in Liberia

Benedict Dossen, a native Liberian and an administrator for the Carter Center’s Liberia Mental Health Program, explains what it is like to watch and help his country heal.

Liberia is a West African country nearly the size of Mississippi with a population of 3.8 million. But unlike many other countries, Liberia only has one practicing psychiatrist. The need for mental …

Technology Aids Center’s Work

The Carter Center is pioneering the use of today’s newest technologies in our efforts to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope in the most isolated and inaccessible places on earth. As a result, we are helping people improve their lives more efficiently and cost-effectively than ever before.

Our work to eradicate and control diseases is a good example. In …

River Blindness Treatment Brings Joy of Marriage Back to Ugandan Village

The success of the Ugandan National Onchocerciasis Program in Abeju means that fewer children will be ostracized because of river blindness.

Many of the benefits of Uganda’s National Onchocerciasis Elimination Program, supported by The Carter Center, are readily apparent: reduced blindness and itching, increased productivity, and better overall health outcomes. For one community in Uganda, however, an additional benefit has …

Celebrating the 100 Millionth Treatment for Blinding Trachoma

In early November, The Carter Center reached a trachoma milestone: supporting the distribution of more than 100 million doses of the trachoma-fighting drug Zithromax®, donated by Pfizer Inc. These treatments were provided over the last 11 years to trachoma-endemic communities in six African countries: Ethiopia, Mali, Nigeria, Niger, Sudan, and South Sudan.

The 100 millionth dose was distributed in Ethiopia’s …

The Affordable Care Act and You

Carter Center expert Dr. John Bartlett, a senior project adviser to the Mental Health Program and organizer of this year’s 29th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, answers your questions submitted via email.

President Carter Discusses Neglected Diseases on ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’

President Carter spoke with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on “Good Morning America” on Nov. 5, about The Carter Center’s fight to wipe out trachoma and combat other neglected diseases.

“No former president has served longer out of office or made such a mark against some of the world’s most intractable problems,” Stephanopoulos said as he introduced the president.…

Art as a Bridge to Health

A community art group has been helping the Carter Center’s Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas (OEPA) highlight vital health messages.

Caja Lúdica, which translates as “the playful box” in English, uses interactive theater, costumes, music, juggling and more to engage communities, using art as a bridge for health education. Recently, the Guatemalan non-profit troupe visited Mexico, at the invitation …

Join Our Conversation on World Mental Health Day, Oct. 10, 2013

On World Mental Health Day, Oct. 10, we here at The Carter Center will pause to reflect upon the many advances in the field of mental health, including improvements in diagnosing and treating mental illnesses, as well as advancing parity for mental health in our health care system. Despite this progress, however, myths and misperceptions about these disorders persist, which …