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100&Change | The Carter Center Takes Aim at a Big Fish

Dr. Frank Richards leads the Carter Center’s efforts to eliminate river blindness (also known as onchocerciasis), a parasitic disease transmitted by the bites of infected black flies.

There’s a famous line in the movie “Jaws” – after the stunned sheriff sees the monster shark for the first time, he says to the shark hunter: “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”…

100&Change | Dr. Frank Richards from the Field

How do dirty clothes hanging in a tree help eliminate river blindness in Nigeria? Dr. Frank Richards, who directs the Carter Center’s programs on river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, and schistosomiasis, explains.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable …

100&Change | Health Education Matters

Dr. Frank Richards, who directs the Carter Center’s programs on river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, and schistosomiasis, explains why health education matters in the fight to eliminate diseases.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a …

From the CEO: Small Actions Yield Big Successes

Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters is the chief executive officer of The Carter Center.

We think big at The Carter Center. Big ideas, big plans, big goals.

Guinea worm disease was a big problem—3.5 million cases a year—when we started working on it, but today we’re within reach of eradicating it. Observing 103 elections in 39 countries has been a …

100&Change | Community Volunteers Key to River Blindness Strategy

Dr. Emmanuel Miri is the country representative in Nigeria for The Carter Center.

Gabriel Ani is a farmer and schoolteacher in the Ndiulo Enugu-Nato village in Enugu State, Nigeria, who loves his community and is loved back. Gabriel is a community volunteer drug distributor — the hands, feet, and heart of our River Blindness Elimination Program. For nine years, he …

100&Change | Community Volunteer Joel Kasuwa Gives Back

Watch how Nigerian Joel Kasuwa, a passionate and committed volunteer, is working with The Carter Center to help us eliminate river blindness in Nigeria.

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a critical problem of our …

100&Change | From the CEO: A Vision for All of Africa

Leveraging the experience of our pioneering work to eradicate Guinea worm disease, The Carter Center made the audacious decision to pursue elimination of river blindness (onchocerciasis) everywhere we work on it in Africa and Latin America.

100&Change | Nigeria’s Minister of Health and the Carter Center’s CEO Discuss River Blindness Elimination

Why is it critical to eliminate river blindness in Nigeria? Our CEO Amb. Mary Ann Peters and Nigerian Minister of Health Dr. Isaac Adewole explain the need and great potential in this brief video.

 

The Carter Center is one of eight semi-finalists in the MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises …

100&Change | MacArthur’s Cecilia Conrad Discusses the Carter Center’s Proposal

Cecilia Conrad, managing director of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, discusses the Carter Center’s 100&Change proposal, which aims to eliminate river blindness in Nigeria.

100&Change is a unique competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that addresses a critical problem of our time in any field or any location.

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New VP Gets Close-up Look at Work in the Field

I’m the new guy around here.

Although I’ve visited and worked in many places during my medical career – including multiple overseas deployments with the U.S. Army – my first trip abroad with The Carter Center was a new highlight.

I had the privilege of joining a delegation that visited Nigeria in the fall of 2016, five months after I …

Nigeria Teen Receives Ceremonial Dose of Praziquantel

Thirteen-year-old Jude Musa looked serious, even stoic, as a volunteer from his village gauged his height with a measuring stick. Community drug distributor Yusuf Maikeffi determined the proper dose of praziquantel and handed the tablets to the boy, who popped them into his mouth and chased them with fresh water from a plastic pouch.

With that small exchange in Gidan …

President Carter Discusses Neglected Diseases on ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’

President Carter spoke with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on “Good Morning America” on Nov. 5, about The Carter Center’s fight to wipe out trachoma and combat other neglected diseases.

“No former president has served longer out of office or made such a mark against some of the world’s most intractable problems,” Stephanopoulos said as he introduced the president.…

Nigerian Village Prevents, Treats Schistosomiasis

Lindsay Rakers is a senior program associate for The Carter Center.

Eight years ago, the urine of 12-year-old Jude Ogwu was consistently red from blood. His father, chief of Aboh, a village in southeast Nigeria, took him to the hospital for treatment but received none. The hospital lacked medicine and the resources needed to treat Ogwu, who was suffering from …

Notes from the Field: Listening to Communities We Serve to Better Combat Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis, Improve Bed Net Education

At the invitation of the Nigerian government, The Carter Center began health program work in Nigeria in 1988. In 2010, the largest long-lasting insecticidal net distribution effort in history to fight malaria was launched in Nigeria, which bears more deaths from this disease than any other country. The goal is to provide every household in the country with two nets. …

10 Million Bed Nets Help Worst-Affected Communities in Nigeria and Ethiopia Fight Malaria

A mother’s lullabies and soft caress are common nighttime rituals for children around the world. But throughout Africa, these soothing efforts cannot spare a child the high fevers, wracking chills, nausea, and headache of malaria–a potentially fatal disease.

However, with help from The Carter Center–and in partnership with the national malaria programs in Nigeria and Ethiopia–millions of families are getting …