The Carter Center Blog

Malaria Fight in Hispaniola Requires Tailored Approach

In honor of Malaria Day in the Americas, we asked Carter Center expert and epidemiologist Dr. Gregory Noland to explain how fighting the disease in Hispaniola differs from strategies employed in Africa.

The island of Hispaniola, shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is the only island in the Caribbean that has not yet eliminated malaria. The Carter Center’s Hispaniola …

Forging a New Path in Myanmar | Q&A with Carter Center Expert Jonathan Stonestreet

At a Glance

Polls opened: Nov. 8
Population: 56,320,206
Registered: 33,500,000
Political parties: 90
Parliament seats: 664 (with 166 reserved for military)
Carter Center observers: 62

This election was the 101st observed by The Carter Center.

After more than 50 years of oppressive military rule, the southeast Asian nation of Myanmar is emerging from isolation and taking its …

Mental Health in Liberia: Stand Up and Act!

Matthew Nyanplu is a journalist in Monrovia, Liberia, and has worked with local and international nongovernmental organizations on human rights and community-based rehabilitation. In July 2015, he co-facilitated the “Mental Health Disabilities and Human Rights” module for the Carter Center’s Post-Basic Mental Health Training Program in Liberia.

In the last few years, there has been an awakening in the consciousness …

Five Important Facts About Guinea Worm

Donald Hopkins, M.D., is special advisor to the Guinea Worm Eradication Program at The Carter Center and has been leading the effort to eradicate this neglected disease for over 25 years. Listen below as he tells NPR’s Robin Young about the Center’s efforts to rid the world of this ancient and painful affliction.


Five Facts About Guinea Worm from

Breaking the Cycle of Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis | Q&A with Dr. Stephen Blount

The Carter Center began its work in Haiti and the Dominican Republic after a 2006 recommendation by the Center-sponsored International Task Force for Disease Eradication declared it is “technically feasible, medically desirable, and economically beneficial” to eliminate both malaria and lymphatic filariasis from the shared island of Hispaniola. 

Today, Dr. Stephen Blount, director of Special Health Programs at The Carter …

Peace in Liberia, 10 Years Later | Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Peace in Liberia, 10 Years Later” at The Carter Center, an archived version of the webcast can be viewed below.

Moderated by WABE reporter Jim Burress, panelists discuss Liberia’s progress and setbacks toward a sustainable peace after its 14-year civil war, including the impact of the Ebola crisis on recovery. The Carter Center has worked in …

Healing Liberia: A Mental Health Crisis

Civil wars, a country in ruins, a traumatized population of four million people, and only one psychiatrist for the entire West African country of Liberia. When the country’s Ministry of Health invited The Carter Center to help build mental health services in the conflict’s aftermath, questions abounded.

Artifacts Paint Picture of Eradication Campaign

A special exhibition exploring the challenges and benefits of eradicating disease runs Jan. 13 – July 12, 2015, at the American Museum of Natural History. Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease, developed in collaboration with The Carter Center, uses stunning photography, videography, and artifacts to highlight several global efforts to fight infections. Chief among these is the campaign led by The …

Center’s Principles Put into Practice in Liberia | From the CEO

Long before I joined The Carter Center as its chief executive officer in August, I knew of its amazing work as an action-oriented nongovernmental organization improving the lives of people worldwide. It is a great honor to join this mission-driven group that pursues with such vigor and effectiveness the vision of President and Mrs. Carter for peace and global human rights.

Tunisians Vote in First Free Presidential Election | Photos

When Tunisians took to the polls on Sunday, Nov. 23, to elect a president of their choice in a genuine democratic election, a Carter Center team of 85 were on hand to observe the election process and report on its fairness.

Mozambique Elections Could Mark Turning Point

Dr. John Stremlau is vice president for peace programs at The Carter Center.

Last week, I was in Mozambique to observe the country’s fifth national election since the end of a bitter civil war that raged for 15 years following the country’s independence from Portugal in 1975.

The election was mostly peaceful and far more competitive, transparent, and inclusive than …

Celebrating 200 Million Doses of Mectizan®

Dr. Frank Richards leads the Carter Center’s efforts to eliminate river blindness (also known as onchocerciasis), a parasitic disease transmitted by the bites of infected black flies. On Aug. 12, 2014, The Carter Center held a special ceremony in northern Uganda to celebrate the distribution of the 200 millionth Mectizan® drug treatment, used to eliminate river blindness, supported by The …

Notes From the Field: In Ethiopia, We Handle Trachoma Directly

I learned how great a need there was for eye services in my community during the 10 years I spent working for the Ethiopian government as an ophthalmic expert. Ethiopia has one of the highest rates of blindness in the world, and trachoma is a major cause of this disability in my country.

It is hard to ignore the groups …

See Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy Demonstration at The Carter Center

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter will provide remarks at an exhibit of Chinese paintings to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the normalization of U.S.-China relations on Thursday, July 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Center’s Cecil B. Day Chapel.  The exhibit is co-sponsored by The Carter Center and the Chinese Artists Association, which is China’s premier art …

Q&A with a Guinea Worm Worker in South Sudan

Tara Brant spent four-and-a-half years working in South Sudan on the front lines of the war on Guinea worm disease. She was a technical assistant and regional coordinator charged with ensuring each case of Guinea worm in her area was contained, educating communities on how to prevent the disease, and tracking down real and rumored outbreaks. She served in South Sudan from 2007 to 2009 and 2011 to 2013. She is currently a graduate student in Liverpool, England.