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Tunisians Vote in First Free Presidential Election | Photos

When Tunisians took to the polls on Sunday, Nov. 23, to elect a president of their choice in a genuine democratic election, a Carter Center team of 85 were on hand to observe the election process and report on its fairness.

Candidate rallies lined Avenue Habib Bourguiba in Tunis Friday evening, the last opportunity for voters to express their support for 27 candidates on the ballot Sunday, Nov. 23.

Candidate rallies filled Avenue Habib Bourguiba in Tunis Friday evening, the last opportunity for voters to express their support for 27 candidates on the ballot Sunday, Nov. 23. After January 2011, this location became known as “the avenue of the revolution.” (All photos: The Carter Center/G. Dubourthoumieu)

 

Candidate rallies lined Avenue Habib Bourguiba in Tunis Friday evening, the last opportunity for voters to express their support for 27 candidates on the ballot Sunday, Nov. 23.

Tunisians voted for one of 27 candidates for president. This festive mother and daughter favored candidate 8.

 

Ambassador (Ret.) Mary Ann Peters, Carter Center CEO, briefs Tunisian and international media about the Center's observation delegation at a polling center in Tunis early on election day. Next to her is co-leader Amb. Audrey Glover of the United Kingdom. The Center deployed about 80 international observers to all 27 constituencies in Tunis.

Ambassador (Ret.) Mary Ann Peters, Carter Center CEO and delegation co-leader, briefs Tunisian and international media about the Center’s observation delegation at a polling center in Tunis early on election day. Next to her is co-leader Ambassador Audrey Glover of the United Kingdom. The Center deployed about 85 international observers to all 27 constituencies in Tunisia.

 

Center Center co-leader Hina Jilani, an international human rights leader from Pakistan, observes at a polling station in greater Tunis. Center observers visited more than 300 polling stations throughout Tunis to assess whether electoral procedures were followed and how well elections were administered on election day. The Center's findings will be released Tuesday, Nov. 25.

Center Center co-leader Hina Jilani, an international human rights leader from Pakistan, observes at a polling station in greater Tunis. Center observers visited 380 polling stations throughout Tunis to assess whether electoral procedures were followed and how well elections were administered on election day. The Center’s findings will be released Tuesday, Nov. 25.

 

Tunisians came to the polls to exercise their right to vote in the first presidential election since the Arab Spring revolution.

Tunisians came out early to vote in the first presidential election under the new Tunisian constitution adopted in January 2014.

 

A voter dips her finger in the ink till just before she fills out her ballot. The visual identification that she has voted will wear off after a few weeks of daily handwashing.

A voter dips her finger in the ink till just before she fills out her ballot. The visual identification that she has voted will wear off after a few weeks of daily handwashing.

 

If the predicted run-off is confirmed by the Independent High Authority for the Elections (ISIE) when results are announced this week, this proud Tunisian couple will be back to refresh the faded ink on their fingers. A Dec. 28 run-off will be the third time they will go to the polls this fall. The Center also observed legislative elections in October.

If the predicted run-off is confirmed by the Independent High Authority for the Elections (ISIE) when results are announced this week, this proud Tunisian couple will be back to refresh the faded ink on their fingers. A December run-off will be the third time they will go to the polls this fall. The Center also observed legislative elections in October.

 

Related Resources

Democracy Takes Root in Tunisia

Learn more about the Center’s Democracy Program

Posted in Democracy, Elections, Peace, Tunisia

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    Dr. Jesse Hargrove on December 17, 2014 at 4:52 pm

    The Legacy of Celia Adams : From Slavery to Freedom on Barnes & Noble website shares an important part of American History and culture. It’s 150 years since the 13th Amendment to the Constitution and the abolition of slavery is being celebrated on campuses and Presidential Centers. I would love to be a part of your Center’s jubilee.
    Jesse Hargrove, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Spanish / Education
    Philander Smith College

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