The Carter Center Blog

ABATE and the Crocodile

There is no vaccine or medicine to fight Guinea worm disease; instead, The Carter Center uses four main interventions to lead the international campaign against the debilitating parasite:

Teaching people to filter potentially infested water to remove Guinea worm-carrying copepods
Educating people with emerging Guinea worms to avoid public water sources, such as ponds, to prevent contaminating them
Empowering village

Carter Center Receives Ronald McDonald House Charities Grant for Mental Health Work in Liberia

One Liberia’s first mental health clinicians, primary care nurse, Quendi Appleton celebrates receiving her diploma from the Carter Center’s Post-Basic Mental Health Training Program in August 2011. The training program is part of a partnership between The Carter Center and the Liberia Ministry of Health and Social Welfare that has dramatically improved access to desperately needed mental health services in

Jordan Elections Offer a Test of Recent Reforms

Jordan’s Jan. 23 parliamentary elections are taking place in a climate of uncertainty, due to dissatisfaction with the pace of electoral reform and frustration with the state of the economy. In late-November there were demonstrations against the monarch, sparked by a sharp increase in gas prices. The upcoming parliamentary elections are the first after a series of limited electoral reforms were implemented. A small Carter Center study team is in Jordan to assess several key political and electoral reform issues.

Virtual Media Roundtable – Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter Releases Guinea Worm Case Numbers for 2012

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Carter Center Guinea worm experts Drs. Donald R. Hopkins and Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben will host a media roundtable via Google+ Hangout to announce the provisional Guinea worm case totals for 2012 and discuss significant progress in the international Guinea worm eradication campaign led by The Carter Center.

Nigerian Village Prevents, Treats Schistosomiasis

Lindsay Rakers is a senior program associate for The Carter Center.

Eight years ago, the urine of 12-year-old Jude Ogwu was consistently red from blood. His father, chief of Aboh, a village in southeast Nigeria, took him to the hospital for treatment but received none. The hospital lacked medicine and the resources needed to treat Ogwu, who was suffering from …